Lance Canales & The Flood, Amber Cross

Lance Canales & The Flood

Amber Cross

Thursday, May 26th

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$18 adv / $20 door

Lance Canales & The Flood
Lance Canales & The Flood are a roots-blues influenced Americana trio from California's breadbasket, where Canales lived the life that so many songs have been written about since the birth of roots music – hard labor, one room shacks and taunting ghosts whispering of a better life. Canales' guttural vocals combine a hard-edged storytelling approach beneath a stripped down, foot-stomping, acoustic instrumentation. The Flood are made up of stand up bassist, David Quinday (whose mournful bowing can be found on tracks such as "Hummingbird Blues" on the bands most recent album "Elixir"). Using an old railroad tamp or playing a stomp box, Carlos Rodriguez keeps the rhythm and beat along with the crowd, as Canales, described on the blog "Bound for Glory" by music Journalist, Robin Wheeler, "… plays hollow-bodied, anger-fueled blues guitar. He growls and stomps with his feet clad in the heavy work boots of his grandfather…"
Canales garnered a reputation as a child of being able to train wild horses and for years was forced to take his lumps in order to help his family make ends meet. It wasn't until he confiscated an older sister's beat up guitar and combined it with vocals he'd discovered in his mother's fire and brimstone church that he was able to slowly carve a way out of the hard toil life with his music. While Canales may have left that life behind that life has never left his music. The bands 2012 released album "Elixir" is no exception. In the song "Digging" a desperate man enters a church house where he finds a, "…preacher screaming fire and hell. People screaming, running, crying, but still I felt no soul."
Canales played solo for years until he began craving a fuller sound and energy to his music and enlisted "The Flood." They've been together since 2009. After playing a gig at the Queens University in Belfast Ireland in 2009 the band was asked to play an impromptu set on the main stage of the Belfast Blues Festival. When they are not traveling, their music is making its way via radio on European stations and XM radio, as well as being featured on several stations at home in the states, including NPR.
In 2012 Lance Canales & The Flood did the soundtrack for the documentary "Dancing the Salmon Home" which is currently being featured at film festivals across the country.
Amber Cross
Amber Cross
Authenticity is a difficult thing to measure in American roots music. It’s not in the hat you wear, or the twang in your voice. It’s in how well you understand that the music comes from the land, and that its roots run deep. Americana songwriter Amber cross understands this, and on her new album, Savage on the Downhill, she makes music as beholden to the landscapes of Northern and Pacific California, where she lives and travels, as to the visually-rich songwriting she crafts around it. Her songs hang heavy with the yellow dust of dirt roads, plunge deep into the soft loam of the forest. As a hunter, a fisherman, and a woman of the backcountry, she knows the countryside well, and has a deep respect for the honest work that makes you a steward of the land. It’s something she shares with other roots musicians, a community she found attending her first Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nevada. Her contacts from the gathering helped her connect with Savage on the Downhill’s producer, Canadian blues and roots musician rAy bonneville. Traveling to Austin to record the album with Bonneville, Cross connected with other great American songwriters, gurf morlix and tim o’brien, who both came onboard for the album, with O’Brien complimenting her “no bullshit style of singing.” If there’s a rawness to Cross’ voice, a plainness to the words, it comes from the fact that Cross knows the roots of this music aren’t fancy. They’re built by hand and filled with honest words and hard-won truths.

The songs on Savage on the Downhill are deeply visual and inextricably tied to nature, whether the California forests that Cross roams through, or the high deserts outside Austin, Texas, where she recorded the album. Even the title of the album paints a picture of Cross in the backcountry. “Savage” refers to a brand of hunting rifle, and the phrase “Savage on the Downhill” refers to how a tracker should hold a rifle so as not to bury the barrel into the dirt when side-hilling or climbing down an incline. Like any artist that works with their hands, Cross has a deep love and respect for tools, seeing the same artistry in a well-worn rifle butt that you would in a perfectly crafted song. “I have always been drawn to work that involves my hands,” Cross says. “It seems to me that this type of work is more creative. Or maybe it is that working with my hands pulls the creativity out of me in a way nothing else does.”