Dom Flemons/Leyla McCalla

Dom Flemons/Leyla McCalla

Wednesday, October 19th

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$25 Advance/$28 Door

Dom Flemons
Dom Flemons
Dom Flemons is known as “the American Songster” for his repertoire of songs spanning over 100 years of American folklore, ballads and tunes, and is an expert player on the banjo, fife, guitar, harmonica, quills, and rhythm bones. A co-founder of the Grammy award-winning Carolina Chocolate Drops, Dom left the band in 2014 to pursue a solo career, and has been touring the world ever since; he’s performed solo at Carnegie Hall, the Museum of African American History, National Cowboy Gathering, Newport Folk Festival and many other places. His newest album, released in 2018, is “Dom Flemons Presents Black Cowboys” on Smithsonian Folkways, part of the African American Legacy Recordings series.
Leyla McCalla
Leyla McCalla
"It's an exhilarating thing, hearing a musical virtuoso explore her voice's unanticipated potential in all of the ways that Leyla McCalla does." - NPR's "Songs We Love"

The Capitalist Blues is Leyla McCalla’s way of processing the current political environment, where many of the issues are financial, but they’re rarely simply financial. “It feels like everyone’s in a pressure cooker in this country,” she says. The album is McCalla’s third, after Vari-Colored Songs: A Tribute to Langston Hughes (2013) and A Day for the Hunter, A Day for the Prey (2016). Those albums and her time as a member of the African-American string band The Carolina Chocolate Drops presented her vision in songs that revealed the realities that people lived, often expressed in metaphors. She explored Haitian Creole identity issues in songs with arrangements that focused on the song. She often sang and accompanied herself on cello, banjo, or guitar. The New York-born McCalla has lived in New Orleans since 2010, and A Day for the Hunter, A Day for the Prey broadened not only her examination of Creole identities but her sound as she brought in a number of musicians to add fiddle, clarinet, piano, electric guitar, and additional voices. Her growing relationship to the city’s musical community led her to consider her relationship to New Orleans on The Capitalist Blues, and for the first time, it led her to record with a band.