Peter Mulvey, Heather Maloney

Peter Mulvey

Heather Maloney

Sunday, February 19th

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm

$20 adv / $22 door

Ticket price includes a $4 facility fee.

Peter Mulvey
Peter Mulvey
THE GOOD STUFF, Peter Mulvey's fifteenth record, is a collection of standards which promptly rejects the accepted definition of "Standard" in favor of a more vivid, open approach. The music of Tom Waits is right there with Duke Ellington; Willie Nelson next to Thelonious Monk; Jolie Holland juxtaposed with Bill Frisell. Mulvey (along with his band, the Crumbling Beauties) address each tune with a true artist's touch. His mirthful, gravelly baritone is front and center from moment one, and every track is a master class in restraint, phrasing, and commitment.

Twenty-odd years on the road, performing songs from his own catalog and from a vast, varied, and deep well of classic and obscure covers, has prepared Mulvey to deliver this collection. Night after night, the process of divining the heart of a song, being alert to where the moment can lead, has shaped him as an artist. To each rendition, he brings the soul of a singer, a light touch in a heavy world.

Ross Bellenoit's Home Songs EP series offers a set of literate, folk-pop compositions that straddle the line between the junkyard blues of Tom Waits' disjunctive grooves and 80s new-wave nerd-pop. Prior to Home Songs, music fans already knew Bellenoit from his 2010 solo vinyl LP Eight Track Mind, and also as the stunning Telecaster slinger for the critically acclaimed Sweetback Sisters (Signature Sounds). He's also lent his guitar skills to internationally renowned songwriters like Amos Lee (Blue Note), Joseph Parsons (Blue Rose), and Birdie Busch (Bar/None). More recently, Bellenoit has been enjoying a blossoming career as a record producer for other artists, having helmed successful debuts for songwriters Suzie Brown, Ginger Coyle and Aaron & The Spell. He's also collaborating with Emily Zeitlyn (The Weeds) in the new indie outfit Divers. His band has been wowing Philadelphia audiences with their muscular yet sweeping sound. His songs are laced with lyrical wizardry, yet packed in a one-two punch of rock and roll dynamism that features a lot of groove and a lot of tasteful guitar pyrotechnics, leaving jaws on floors, ears vibrating and faces melted.
Heather Maloney
Heather Maloney
Heather Maloney returns with a new album, Making Me Break, that Bluegrass Situation calls “an intoxicating blend that captures the sonic texture of indie rock, the humanity of folk, and the spirituality of a Rumi poem.” She started writing songs after living and working for three years in a silent-retreat meditation center in central Massachusetts. “It really gave me a sense of purpose in my writing,” she says. “If I didn’t write songs, I’d be covered in tattoos, because every song I write is something I want to remember really badly.”

Singout! calls her music “a glorious mix of old and new,” and praises her “passion and talent.” Her pure, crystalline voice calls to mind Joni Mitchell, which is why, when she played a house concert with Darlingside at the home of a New York Times music critic, she and the band were urged to record Joni’s song “Woodstock.” The video of that recording went viral. “Hipster detachment is so not me,” Heather says. “I’m a raw person, sensitive to a fault.” That sensitivity and deep immersion in the music is apparent in every note she sings. The Huffington Post praises her “lyrics that cut to the chase,” and DigBoston declares that she “deserves the type of cult following that has brought success to the likes of Aimee Mann and Ani DiFranco.” Here is a talented young performer who lays it all on the line. The results are stunning.