Maurice Tani, Aireene Espiritu, Joe Rut

The Spark Series: Three Inspired Songwriters

Maurice Tani

Aireene Espiritu

Joe Rut

Friday, August 18th

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$18 ADV / $22 DOOR

All tickets are subject to an additional $4 per ticket facility fee.

Maurice Tani
Maurice Tani
San Francisco native, Maurice Tani is a "rye-to-romantic" singer-songwriter with seven albums to his credit -the latest being The Lovers Card, released on the Little Village label. With his band, 77 El Deora, Tani has been the source of untold, but exquisite suffering on the Bay Area Americana scene for over 15 years.
Tani uses the term, “Supercalifornigraphic” to describe his particular flavor of Americana. While rooted in country music, Tani's writing is centered on a West Coast perspective. “Though much of my material is based on fictional characters and situations, I still write what I know. I'm not particularly comfortable or interested in the rural imagery of tractors, 4x4s or general agriculture common in much country music. What attracts me most about country is the story telling side of it. My stories are more likely to be centered around an urban experience. I'm a Californian from a large metropolitan area and I write about the things that hold my attention. I think of these songs as a sort of cinema for the blind. Short musical narratives of life on the left coast.”
Aireene Espiritu
Aireene Espiritu
Aireene is a singer/songwriter based in Oakland, CA, playing mostly original songs accompanied by latin/african rhythms, folk, bluegrass pickings and inspirations from gospel music - a mix of stompin', swayin', and timeless Americana.
Joe Rut
Joe Rut
On his 6th album release, Stolen Tools & Stereos, Oakland songwriter Joe Rut’s quirky sense of humor underpins a heartfelt, richly lyrical and subtly hallucinatory Americana/Alt-country tapestry. Joe drunk dials his friends at 3 AM Tuesday morning, sings an abandoned black-velvet Elvis painting back home to Tupelo, pictures all his earthly belongings for sale at a flea market after his death, and ponders the tragic mating rituals of porcupines.

It is a deeply American music, although the border guards seem to have been bribed with psychedelics to look the other way. Much of the album was written in a year-long road trip, during which Joe travelled the main streets and backroads of California with his dog Potato in a converted Ford Econoline Van, writing songs daily in The Pretty Good Book, a 3-inch thick antique accounting ledger given to him by friends for the trip.

“They told me to fill it up. I filled 200 pages. It needed a name. I thought it was better than pretty good,” says Joe, “but ‘*The Good Book*’ was already taken, so…”