Peter Rowan My Aloha with Douglas Tolentino and Jeff AuHoy

Peter Rowan My Aloha with Douglas Tolentino and Jeff AuHoy

Special Guest Patrick Landeza

Saturday, December 9th

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$26 ADV / $30 DOOR (plus fees)

All tickets are subject to an additional $4 per ticket facility fee.

Peter Rowan
Peter Rowan
Peter Rowan celebrates bluegrass traditions with mix of originals and songs by Carter and Ralph Stanley, A.P. Carter, Lead Belly, Bill Monroe and others.

Rowan was just a young bluegrass boy when he caught the attention of Bill Monroe, who made him an actual Blue Grass Boy in 1963, or maybe ’64. Rowan isn’t certain exactly when he became the band’s guitarist and lead singer, but the moment Monroe introduced him to fellow icon Carter Stanley is etched in his memory just as indelibly as the inked entry in his 1966 diary. Within a few months, Stanley would be gone, but the impact he and his brother, Ralph, had on Rowan — and the world — would grow even stronger. He acknowledges their influence, and finally gives the story of that meeting a definitive telling, with his new Rebel Records album, Carter Stanley’s Eyes.

The album pays respects to bluegrass’s most famous brothers with two songs penned by each; others, such as the traditional “Hills of Roane County” and the Carter Family’s “Will You Miss Me,” were Stanley Brothers staples. Even the album’s opener, Rowan’s own “Drumbeats on the Watchtower,” nods to Ralph, who retitled it (from “Wild Geese Cry Again”) when he recorded it.

Obviously, Rowan didn’t mind. In fact, he was ecstatic when Stanley told him he’d cut it. “To me, that was real fulfillment, to be covered by one of the masters,” he says.

“But this album is not a tribute to the Stanley Brothers; it’s an honoring of them, and of my roots,” Rowan clarifies. More specifically, it maps the path he followed from their musical roads to his own. Along the way, he visits Monroe (“Can’t You Hear Me Calling”), the Louvin Brothers (“A Tiny Broken Heart”) and Lead Belly (“Alabama Bound”), whose presence reinforces both his and Monroe’s blues influences.

Photo Credit: Amanda Rowan
Special Guest Patrick Landeza
Special Guest Patrick Landeza
When Patrick Landeza became the first mainland-based artist to win the Nā Hōkū Hanohano award in 2013, he told the audience, “Being born and raised on the mainland never made me any less Hawaiian.” Having initially learned how to play slack key guitar from family, Landeza later apprenticed with slack key legend, Raymond Kāne, and was mentored by slack key masters such as Cyril Pahinui, George Kuo, and Dennis Kamakahi. Landeza is a well-respected slack key instructor and has taught classes and at music camps nationwide, as well as had his lessons published in Acoustic Guitar Magazine. After successful forays into radio, catering, and concert production, Landeza is beginning to focus his attention on future generations. In 2013 he authored a children’s book, “Danny’s Hawaiian Journey,” and has partnered with schools and youth groups to provide cultural education through ukulele lessons in his grade school classes. Landeza’s efforts and enthusiasm have not gone unrecognized. Aside from a Nā Hōkū Hanohano award, he also became the youngest recipient of the Kapalakiko Aloha Spirit award at the age of 34. In 2011 he won the Hawaiian Music Award, and in 2012 he shared his music and aloha spirit with an appreciative audience at Carnegie Hall.