Della Mae

Della Mae

Phoebe Hunt, North Country Blue (on the Gallery Stage), Bluegrass Pride

Friday, March 23rd

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$20 ADV / $24 DOOR (plus fees)

  • All tickets are subject to an additional $4 per ticket facility fee.

Della Mae
Della Mae
“smart and assured, a continuation of the band’s penchant for blurring the lines between bluegrass, folk, soul, and old-time traditions”
-The Boston Globe

“never failing to deliver punch, soul and emotion in equal measure … rootsy, prayerful, spiritual almost – a statement of purpose and direction”
-Pop Matters

“arresting, defiant” -NPR

Since forming in Boston in 2009, Nashville-based string band Della Mae has established a reputation as a charismatic live act comprised of some of the finest players in bluegrass, Americana and beyond.

Originating from different musical backgrounds and states across the US and Canada, each member brings distinct elements that make Della Mae such a beloved band. Together they have a completely original style – sensitive yet assertive, intense yet playful, steeped in tradition yet undeniably current. Versatile instrumentalists and vocalists, they draw from a bottomless well of roots influences to create vibrant original music that conveys expansive musical vision. With timeless lyrical truth-telling and an unmistakably contemporary sensibility, they stand alongside such roots-conscious acts as the Avett Brothers, Punch Brothers, the Lumineers, and Hurray for the Riff Raff.

They were IBMA’s Emerging Artists of the Year in 2013, GRAMMY Nominees in 2014 for their debut album on Rounder Records, named among Rolling Stone’s “10 bands to watch for in 2015,” and have since traveled with the US State Department to over 18 countries spreading peace and understanding through music.
Phoebe Hunt
Phoebe Hunt
On the seventh day of a ten-day retreat at a Vipassana meditation center outside the historic Indian city of Kolhapur, Phoebe Hunt intrinsically felt the life leave her namesake’s body on the other side of the world.

The story of how she came to be known as Phoebe — a tale woven subtly into the whimsical threads and spiritual contradictions of Shanti’s Shadow, her new record — has the humor and richness of a Vedic myth. Her parents met at a yoga ashram in the Lower West Side of Manhattan in the Seventies, where they spent seven years as disciples of Guru Swami Satchidananda, famous in America for having been the opening speaker at the 1969 Woodstock Festival. Years later, near the end of her pregnancy with Phoebe, her mother felt a strong compulsion to name her child Shanti, a Hindi word meaning peace. There was only one minor complication — she had already promised the child’s paternal grandmother, Phoebe, that she would be named after her. In a compromise, Hunt’s parents named their child Shanti Phoebe Hunt, but out of deference to the grandmother, she would grow up being called Phoebe.

Years later, on the 2016 trip that would inspire the creation of Shanti’s Shadow, Hunt and her husband (and mandolin-playing bandmate) Dominick Leslie entered the meditation retreat in India, surrendered their possessions, and, with only a wool blanket given to them upon arrival, committed to a sequestered ten-day vow of silence. It was during that stint at the retreat that Grandma Phoebe passed away. Hunt remained in India with Leslie and a team of musicians who had joined the couple to study with master violinist and vocalist Kala Ramnath at an ashram outside the city of Pune. While there they found themselves spending as many as ten hours a day honing ragas, melodic structures that, in the Indian classical tradition, are believed to have the capacity to color the mind of an audience. The entire experience, ripe with creative efflorescence, formed the core of a bittersweet irony for Hunt. While in pursuit of her spiritual namesake — the shanti of peace, tranquility, creativity, and bliss — her familial namesake passed away.
North Country Blue (on the Gallery Stage)
North Country Blue (on the Gallery Stage)
North Country Blue includes some of the best young bluegrass musicians in California – four young women whose ages range from just 12 to 14. All of the girls have been stalwarts in the California Bluegrass Association’s “Kids on Bluegrass” program and Youth Academy, and they have several years of prior band experience among them despite their young age. The band members come from all over Northern California – from Berkeley to the Sierra foothills to the Central Valley – and chose their name after it was dropped in their tip bucket as a suggestion at a street fair.
Bluegrass Pride
Bluegrass Pride
Founded on the principle that bluegrass is for anybody and everybody, the CBA created Bluegrass Pride in 2017, an initiative to become the first ever bluegrass association to take part in an LGBT Pride celebration. By doing so, Bluegrass Pride hoped to take the love, acceptance, and joy at the heart of this music and invite the world to take it with them. This message struck a chord with the crowds and judges of SF Pride, who loved their unique and enthusiastic presence in the parade. The California Bluegrass Association and Bluegrass Pride were officially named the Best Overall Contingent in the 2017 SF Pride Parade, the first time in parade history that a first-time entrant has won the top prize. Now in their second year, Bluegrass Pride is continuing to grow and spread the word that bluegrass is for everybody, by hosting regular beginner-friendly jams, sponsoring a local concert series, and marching in the 2018 SF Pride Parade.