Peter Bradley Adams

graceful, low-key roots-based indie rock

Peter Bradley Adams

Misty Boyce

Wednesday, May 23rd

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$18 ADV / $22 DOOR (plus fees)

  • All tickets are subject to an additional $4 per ticket facility fee.

Peter Bradley Adams
Peter Bradley Adams
Originally from Birmingham, Alabama, Peter Bradley Adams was one half of the duo, Eastmountainsouth and has since released six solo records.

No Depression calls him, “consistently eloquent," and the Wall Street Journal says he’s, “one of the 21st Century writers whose songs are worth exploring.”

There's a confidence, a completeness in the song cycle that listeners have gleaned throughout Adams' illustrious career, but A Face Like Mine, his sixth solo effort, brings it all into sharp focus. As Adams sees it, “On the long plod of finding my voice as a singer and a writer, the singing has slowly developed from the sound of a scared guy to someone who believes what he's saying and the writing, I hope, has become less rigid — both in the lyrics and the phrasing.”

Less rigid, indeed. Adams' brand of Americana nestles his often delicate, always heartfelt voice in the warm embrace of gentle guitar, tasteful dobro, subtle banjo, supportive bass, and unhurried percussion. The result is a sonic scape that, in turn, wraps itself around the listener like a soft blanket on a cold day. With A Face Like Mine, Adams further refines the simple musical sophistication that has become his trademark.
Misty Boyce
Misty Boyce
Misty Boyce’s forthcoming third LP, Get Lost, is a dark, slow-burning, yet subtly hopeful indie-pop record. It finds the Los Angeles-based singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist wrestling valiantly with tragedy and loss, death, drugs and religion, isolation, depression and the emptiness of fame.

A sought-after keyboardist, Boyce performed with Sara Bareilles in support of her Grammy-nominated album, The Blessed Unrest, and opened sold-out shows for Bareilles across New Zealand, Japan and Singapore. Boyce has also backed Sting and Ingrid Michaelson and, most recently, toured with BØRNS, sharing bills with Mumford and Sons and The Lumineers, and performing on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon.

But in the midst of all this globetrotting success, and her burgeoning career as a solo artist, Boyce was sent reeling by the loss of two family members—first, her step-brother to an opiate overdose and, just a year later, her step-father to suicide. Struggling to cope with their deaths, the songs she’d been working on began to shift focus. Soon, she was taking a shot into the void, trying desperately, through music, to find some sense of meaning and connection in the pain.