Berkeley Bluegrass Festival - Laurie Lewis and the Right Hands with Molly Tuttle, Sean Watkins with the Bee Eaters, Crying Uncle

Berkeley Bluegrass Festival - Laurie Lewis and the Right Hands with Molly Tuttle, Sean Watkins with the Bee Eaters, Crying Uncle

Sean Watkins with the Bee Eaters, Crying Uncle, Fog Holler (on the Gallery Stage)

Friday, May 18th

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$30 ADV / $34 DOOR (plus fees)

 

  • All tickets are subject to an additional $4 per ticket facility fee.

Laurie Lewis and the Right Hands
Laurie Lewis and the Right Hands
Bluegrass doesn’t get any better than Laurie Lewis & the Right Hands. She’s Berkeley’s own, she’s won the International Bluegrass Music Association award for Female Vocalist of the Year multiple times, not to mention a Grammy for her contribution to True Life Blues: The Songs of Bill Monroe, and her Right Hands are about as talented as a band has a right to be. Laurie sings and plays guitar and fiddle. Tom Rozum sings, swaps jokes, and plays mandolin, mandola, and guitar, Patrick Sauber plays banjo, Brandon Godman plays fiddle, and Sam Grisman plays bass. If you’ve never heard them before, you need to hear them as soon as you can. And if you’ve already heard them, chances are you want to hear them again. Singout! calls Laurie “one of the leading lights of American acoustic music, a genuine national treasure,” and Country Standard Time says that she “has recorded some of the finest folk-inspired music of the past three decades.”
Sean Watkins with the Bee Eaters
Sean Watkins with the Bee Eaters
Singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Sean Watkins has long been known for his work as one-third of the Grammy Award-winning Nickel Creek and, more recently, for helming, with sister Sara, the itinerant, genre-hopping Watkins Family Hour ensemble. But in the last year he has more assertively – and impressively – taken on the role of solo artist. What To Fear is a follow-up to 2014’s acclaimed All I Do Is Lie, which had been Watkins’ first solo effort in nearly a decade, ten years that had been jammed with collaborative projects and a herculean amount of touring. On his own, Watkins displays tremendous warmth and soulfulness as a singer, a refreshing candor and humor as a lyricist, and prodigious skill as an arranger. And he doesn’t merely stick with the familiar: On What To Fear, he bolsters an acoustic lineup with a rock rhythm section, bringing drama and drive to these new tracks while keeping intact the emotional intimacy of all the stories he is telling.
Crying Uncle
Crying Uncle
Crying Uncle was founded by Quale brothers Miles (age 14, on fiddle and vocals) and Teo (age 11, on mandolin and vocals). The brothers, who are state fiddle and mandolin champions and national runners-up in fiddle have been featured on KQED ’s The California Report and have toured with sibling music duo and mentors, Tashina and Tristan Clarridge. They've performed on stage with bluegrass bands Sideline and Special Consensus and renowned guitarist George Cole; and with their former band, Rambling Minors, opened for fiddler Michael Cleveland.

Originally, Crying Uncle invited guest musicians to collaborate with them. Now, Crying Uncle BG Band has realized the band members' expansive take on bluegrass music. CUBG includes:
Andrew Osborn (age 15, on bass and vocals) and John Gooding (age 16, on guitar and vocals). Known for his rock-solid rhythm and fiery bass solos, Andrew began studying music at age 4 and
at age 11, fell in love with the string bass. He has had guest appearances with a number of Bay Area bluegrass bands and is a regular member of the band, Festival Speed.

John’s only 16 but you’d never guess that from his superb flatpicking guitar work. John has been playing bluegrass
for many years with his two brothers and dad, and was selected to represent the California Bluegrass Association at the prestigious IBMA conference in 2014, 2015 and 2017. He was CBA's Teen Ambassador in 2016 and 2017. He regularly performs with his other band, The Blue J's.

CUBG has opened for prestigious bands such as The Del McCoury Band and David Grisman Bluegrass Experience . As members of other bands and individually, they have played at venues such as IBMA ’s World of Bluegrass Festival, CBA’s Father's Day Bluegrass Festival and the Freight & Salvage.
Fog Holler (on the Gallery Stage)
Fog Holler (on the Gallery Stage)
​The enigmatic Fog Holler first ​arose in ​the foothills of Echo Mountain, the product of an intense love of bluegrass and traditional American music shared by banjoist Casey Holmberg, guitarist Tommy Schulz, and bass fiddler Noa Laniakea. After years roaming those southern hills, honing their craft and spreading the high lonesome sound, the​y​ vanished. With the belief their music could be pushed further and harder, they retreated to the mist​y oak​en​ hollows of Northern California. After months of silence, rumors of a spectral band ​that ​channel ​the ​spirits of bluegrass past and future have begun​ to​ spread 'round all corners of the deep Frisco Bay. ​T​he Fog is rolling in... ​