BBF Berkeley Bluegrass Festival - 3-Day Pass

BBF Berkeley Bluegrass Festival - 3-Day Pass

Fog Holler (on the Gallery Stage), Bluegrass Pride, North Country Blue (on the Gallery Stage)

Friday, May 18th - Sunday, May 20th

8:00 pm

$75 (plus fees)

Get 3-Day Pass

 

  • The 3-Day Pass is only available if purchased in advance.
  • FRIDAY 5/18 - Doors 7pm / Show 8pm
    SATURDAY 5/19 - Doors 7pm / Show 8pm
    SUNDAY 5/20 - Doors 6pm / Show 7pm
  • All tickets are subject to an additional $4 per ticket facility fee.

Laurie Lewis and the Right Hands with Molly Tuttle
Laurie Lewis and the Right Hands with Molly Tuttle
Bluegrass doesn’t get any better than Laurie Lewis & the Right Hands. She’s Berkeley’s own, she’s won the International Bluegrass Music Association award for Female Vocalist of the Year multiple times, not to mention a Grammy for her contribution to True Life Blues: The Songs of Bill Monroe, and her Right Hands are about as talented as a band has a right to be. Laurie sings and plays guitar and fiddle. Tom Rozum sings, swaps jokes, and plays mandolin, mandola, and guitar, Patrick Sauber plays banjo, Brandon Godman plays fiddle, and Sam Grisman plays bass. If you’ve never heard them before, you need to hear them as soon as you can. And if you’ve already heard them, chances are you want to hear them again. Singout! calls Laurie “one of the leading lights of American acoustic music, a genuine national treasure,” and Country Standard Time says that she “has recorded some of the finest folk-inspired music of the past three decades.”

A virtuoso multi-instrumentalist and award winning songwriter with a distinctive voice, Molly has turned the heads of even the most seasoned industry professionals. She began performing on stage when she was 11, and recorded her first album, The Old Apple Tree, at age 13. Since then, she’s appeared on A Prairie Home Companion and at Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, was featured on the cover of Flatpicking Guitar Magazine, won first place in the prestigious Chris Austin Songwriting Competition at Merlefest, and, this fall, received a Momentum Award from the International Bluegrass Music Association in the instrumentalist category. Her lovely voice, impeccable guitar playing, and sensitive song writing make her a star on the rise. She has already received more than two million YouTube views and is currently gearing up to release her first solo EP.
Sean Watkins with the Bee Eaters
Sean Watkins with the Bee Eaters
Singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Sean Watkins has long been known for his work as one-third of the Grammy Award-winning Nickel Creek and, more recently, for helming, with sister Sara, the itinerant, genre-hopping Watkins Family Hour ensemble. But in the last year he has more assertively – and impressively – taken on the role of solo artist. What To Fear is a follow-up to 2014’s acclaimed All I Do Is Lie, which had been Watkins’ first solo effort in nearly a decade, ten years that had been jammed with collaborative projects and a herculean amount of touring. On his own, Watkins displays tremendous warmth and soulfulness as a singer, a refreshing candor and humor as a lyricist, and prodigious skill as an arranger. And he doesn’t merely stick with the familiar: On What To Fear, he bolsters an acoustic lineup with a rock rhythm section, bringing drama and drive to these new tracks while keeping intact the emotional intimacy of all the stories he is telling.
Crying Uncle
Crying Uncle
Crying Uncle was founded by Quale brothers Miles (age 14, on fiddle and vocals) and Teo (age 11, on mandolin and vocals). The brothers, who are state fiddle and mandolin champions and national runners-up in fiddle have been featured on KQED ’s The California Report and have toured with sibling music duo and mentors, Tashina and Tristan Clarridge. They've performed on stage with bluegrass bands Sideline and Special Consensus and renowned guitarist George Cole; and with their former band, Rambling Minors, opened for fiddler Michael Cleveland.

Originally, Crying Uncle invited guest musicians to collaborate with them. Now, Crying Uncle BG Band has realized the band members' expansive take on bluegrass music. CUBG includes:
Andrew Osborn (age 15, on bass and vocals) and John Gooding (age 16, on guitar and vocals). Known for his rock-solid rhythm and fiery bass solos, Andrew began studying music at age 4 and
at age 11, fell in love with the string bass. He has had guest appearances with a number of Bay Area bluegrass bands and is a regular member of the band, Festival Speed.

John’s only 16 but you’d never guess that from his superb flatpicking guitar work. John has been playing bluegrass
for many years with his two brothers and dad, and was selected to represent the California Bluegrass Association at the prestigious IBMA conference in 2014, 2015 and 2017. He was CBA's Teen Ambassador in 2016 and 2017. He regularly performs with his other band, The Blue J's.

CUBG has opened for prestigious bands such as The Del McCoury Band and David Grisman Bluegrass Experience . As members of other bands and individually, they have played at venues such as IBMA ’s World of Bluegrass Festival, CBA’s Father's Day Bluegrass Festival and the Freight & Salvage.
Phantoms of the High Country
In the 1970’s, San Francisco became an unlikely Mecca for bluegrass music. The Southern rural sounds had made incursions into popular culture via the movie soundtracks of “Bonnie and Clyde” and “Deliverance.” Busloads of Japanese tourists would unload at Paul’s Saloon, the Marina District bar that served up bluegrass or bluegrass-tinged music seven nights/week, and the joint was hopping most nights. When national touring bands came to San Francisco, they often made a stop at Paul’s Saloon, to listen to and maybe jam with the locals. JD Crowe and the New South (with Ricky Skaggs, Tony Rice, and Jerry Douglas) graced the stage on their way to Japan. Ralph Stanley and Bill Monroe were both known to stop in after playing the Great American Music Hall. If you were interested in bluegrass in the Bay Area, it was the place to be.

The Paul’s Saloon scene was pioneered by guitarist Bob Fowler and fiddler Ingrid Herman (Woody Herman’s daughter) and their band, the Styx River Ferry. As the music grew in popularity throughout the country, many of the Bay Area bluegrass players moved on to Nashville to further their careers. The Styx River Ferry bandmates were the first wave of that reverse migration. But they had plowed fertile ground from which a strong local bluegrass scene grew. The bands High Country and The Phantoms of the Opry were arguably the most popular of that scene. The Phantoms of the High Country is made up of members of both these bands, coming together to celebrate that vibrant decade. Pat Enright (guitar) left the Bay Area in 1974, and is a founding member of the now-legendary Nashville Bluegrass Band. He gained fame as the voice of one of the Soggy Bottom Boys in “Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?” He will be joined by High Country’s Butch Waller (mandolin) and Larry Cohea (banjo), High Country alumnus emeritus Ed Neff (fiddle/mandolin), and Phantoms of the Opry alumni Paul ShelaskyGene Tortora (dobro) and Laurie Lewis (bass).
Molly Tuttle Band
Molly Tuttle Band
A virtuoso multi-instrumentalist and award winning songwriter with a distinctive voice, Molly has turned the heads of even the most seasoned industry professionals. She began performing on stage when she was 11, and recorded her first album, The Old Apple Tree, at age 13. Since then, she’s appeared on A Prairie Home Companion and at Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, was featured on the cover of Flatpicking Guitar Magazine, won first place in the prestigious Chris Austin Songwriting Competition at Merlefest, and, this fall, received a Momentum Award from the International Bluegrass Music Association in the instrumentalist category. Her lovely voice, impeccable guitar playing, and sensitive song writing make her a star on the rise. She has already received more than two million YouTube views and is currently gearing up to release her first solo EP.
Jeff Scroggins & Colorado
Jeff Scroggins & Colorado
Jeff Scroggins & Colorado is a high-energy five-piece bluegrass band located in the Western Frontier state of Colorado. Their distinctive sound showcases an eclectic range of influences that marry second and third generation bluegrass, delivering a unique experience that captivates audiences and keeps them guessing: It’s a powerful, high mountain “bluegrass explosion” that features world-class banjo and mandolin playing, incredible vocals, a solid and energetic rhythm and an easy stage banter that has delighted listeners all over the world.

Fronted by internationally acclaimed two-time National Banjo Champion ​Jeff Scroggins, their distinct style is immediately recognizable due to Jeff’s unique and diverse range of influences, which include Alan Munde, Don Reno, Jimmy Page and Eric Clapton. His fiery style and lightning-fast licks have earned him worldwide recognition and have left many a first-time listener in stunned disbelief!

The band also features the award-winning mandolin playing of Jeff’s son Tristan Scroggins. At only 21 years old, Tristan is an award-winning instrumentalist and accomplished songwriter in his own right while the instrumentals he shares with Jeff play a large role in the band’s unique and energetic style. In 2016, Tristan was nominated for the Instrumental Momentum Award by the International Bluegrass Music Association . West Virginia native Greg Blake provides powerful bluegrass vocals steeped in country heritage, bringing a truly authentic sound developed from a lifetime of singing bluegrass, gospel, and country. Twice nominated for the Society for the Preservation of Bluegrass Music in America's (SPBGMA) “Traditional Male Vocalist of the Year” award, Greg’s phenomenal guitar playing has earned him nine nominations and five consecutive wins as SPBGMA’s Guitarist of the Year. They are joined by Oregon native, 2016 Rockygrass Fiddle Champion, 2016 Arizona State Fiddle Champion, and 2017 IBMA Momentum Award Nominee Ellie Hakanson on fiddle and vocals. In addition to their individual accomplishments, the band was featured as the California Bluegrass Association's Emerging Artist of the year, an honor given into the past to bands such as Della Mae, and Chris Henry & the Hardcore Grass.
Darol Anger's Blur-Grass All-Stars
Darol Anger's Blur-Grass All-Stars
Darol Anger's Blur-grass All-Stars
–John Jorgenson, Keith Little, Sharon Gilchrist, Joe K. Walsh–
Are showing up to play the Bluegrass Music.

It's a concatenation of some of the most brilliant Acoustic String Music stars, all of whom are excellent at standing out while blending. If they don't want you to notice them, you won't… but when the Chips are Down, the Pizza is Delivered with rockets and sirens.

Much like fondue; a great hot thick compost of taste, tying the room together but leading boldly from the center of the table.
And they will play Bluegrass with force, subtlety, and lovely touches of humor and grace.

3 of the most influential of the West Coast branch of Acoustic Music players:

Fiddler Anger, guitarist-multi-instrumental virtuoso John Jorgenson, and 5-string banjoist Keith Little, together for the first time, join two highly beloved musicians bassist/mandolinist Sharon Gilchrist and mandolinist Joe K. Walsh.

Darol is of course the legendary fiddler and co-instigator of The David Grisman Quintet, the Turtle Island String Quartet and Windham Hill's flagship, The Montreux Band. He played Bluegrass in the early 70's in the San Jose and Santa Cruz area before touring internationally, and is part of the 2nd wave of pickers to come up in Northern California's Bluegrass Scene, and studied with Byron Berline and Richard Greene.

Guitarist John Jorgenson's even-more-stellar ride began in Southern California, working with the original Southern California crew of Newgrass artists, the Desert Rose Band, featuring Chris Hillman. His subsequent collaborations with Earl Scruggs, Bonnie Raitt, Elton John, Luciano Pavarotti, Bob Dylan and many others have turned out rather well. Not to be content with Bluegrass and shedding Rock guitar (the Hellecasters), John has become “the US Ambassador of Gypsy Jazz” , and honors the legacy of Django by touring his unique brand of Gypsy Jazz internationally with the John Jorgenson Quintet.

Born in the Sierra Nevada foothills of Northern California, banjo master Keith Little was first introduced to string band music by his father, and quickly mastered the guitar, 5-string banjo, mandolin, and fiddle. As a youngster, Keith worked with NorCal bluegrass legends Vern Williams & Ray Park. Throughout a forty plus year performing career, Keith has been a key member of Vern Williams Band, Rose Maddox, The Grant Street String Band, High Country, the Country Gentlemen, Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder, Lonesome Standard Time, Peter Rowan, and the David Grisman Bluegrass Experience.

That's right - she IS from Texas! Sharon Gilchrist is equally formidable on mandolin and acoustic bass, and is now one of the most sought-after musicians in Northern California. Her work with Mary & Mars, Uncle Earl, The Republic Of Strings, Laurie Lewis, Scott Law, and on Darol's recent Bluegrass instrumental recording "E-and'a" makes her an essential ingredient for the Fondue.

Boston-based mandolinist Joe K. Walsh is known for his exceptional tone and melodic gift. His collaborations with acoustic music luminaries including Danny Barnes, Scott Nygaard, folk star Jonathan Edwards, and pop/grass darlings Joy Kills Sorrow have taken him all over the world. He’s played with John Scofield, Bela Fleck and Emmylou Harris, and performed everywhere from festivals to laundromats to Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium. After award-winning years as mandolinist with the Gibson Brothers, Joe currently splits his time between Mr Sun (with Grant Gordy & Anger), and his own band.
The Get Down Boys
The Get Down Boys
The Get Down Boys have been a staple in the Southern California Bluegrass scene over the past six years. They have performed all over the country including appearances at Grey Fox Bluegrass Festival, Joe Val Festival, OGDEN, Grass Valley Bluegrass, The Grammy's P&E Events honoring T-Bone Burnett & Neil Young, The Hollywood Bowls Summer Sounds Series, The Porchlight Sessions Nashville Premier at the Franklin Theatre with Steve Martin & Steep Canyon Rangers, FOX's Good Day LA, performances with Ed Helms, John C Reilly, John Mayer, Willie Watson, and has provided music for Comedy Central's Brickleberry.

With a recent major lineup change the band is fresh and ready for a new approach. The boys have just released an EP of original material and personal favorites with a new spin the band is known for. The group currently consists of Israel Parker on dobro, Mark Cassidy of The Hillbenders(Compass Records), Evan Winsor on bass, and Scott Gates on guitar. The boys are excited to be making music together and ready to make a mark on the national bluegrass scene.

The Page Turners with Bill Evans and Max Schwartz
The Page Turners with Bill Evans and Max Schwartz
Boston’s Berklee College of Music has helped shape the musical trajectory of many of today’s leading young players on the progressive acoustic scene, from Gillian Welch to Chris Pandolfi (The Infamous Stringdusters) & Molly Tuttle. Add to this list The Page Turners, who make their Freight debut in this Berkeley Bluegrass Festival appearance, augmented by Bay Area favorites Bill Evans (banjo) and Max Schwartz (bass). Stockton, CA native Carolyn Kendrick (fiddle, guitar) and Jake Howard (mandolin, guitar) combine awe-inspiring instrumental chops with incisive songwriting and stellar arrangements that blend traditionally-based authenticity with a fearless adventurousness. The duo are winners of the 2016 Freshgrass Best Duo award and have toured all across the United States from their home base of Austin, Texas. Joining the duo is author/teacher/performer Bill Evans, the Bay Area’s gift to the world of the five-string banjo, who hosts the annual California Banjo Extravaganza each year at the Freight, and composer/bassist/banjo player Max Schwartz, a veteran of Laurie Lewis’ band who has performed in the GRAMMY jazz combos and is currently attending the University of Miami’s Frost School of Music.

For more on The Page Turners, visit: http://www.pageturnersmusic.com

For more on Bill Evans, visit: http://www.billevansbanjo.com

For more on Max Schwartz, visit: https://www.maxschwartzmusic.com
Fog Holler (on the Gallery Stage)
Fog Holler (on the Gallery Stage)
​The enigmatic Fog Holler first ​arose in ​the foothills of Echo Mountain, the product of an intense love of bluegrass and traditional American music shared by banjoist Casey Holmberg, guitarist Tommy Schulz, and bass fiddler Noa Laniakea. After years roaming those southern hills, honing their craft and spreading the high lonesome sound, the​y​ vanished. With the belief their music could be pushed further and harder, they retreated to the mist​y oak​en​ hollows of Northern California. After months of silence, rumors of a spectral band ​that ​channel ​the ​spirits of bluegrass past and future have begun​ to​ spread 'round all corners of the deep Frisco Bay. ​T​he Fog is rolling in... ​
Bluegrass Pride
Bluegrass Pride
Founded on the principle that bluegrass is for anybody and everybody, the CBA created Bluegrass Pride in 2017, an initiative to become the first ever bluegrass association to take part in an LGBT Pride celebration. By doing so, Bluegrass Pride hoped to take the love, acceptance, and joy at the heart of this music and invite the world to take it with them. This message struck a chord with the crowds and judges of SF Pride, who loved their unique and enthusiastic presence in the parade. The California Bluegrass Association and Bluegrass Pride were officially named the Best Overall Contingent in the 2017 SF Pride Parade, the first time in parade history that a first-time entrant has won the top prize. Now in their second year, Bluegrass Pride is continuing to grow and spread the word that bluegrass is for everybody, by hosting regular beginner-friendly jams, sponsoring a local concert series, and marching in the 2018 SF Pride Parade.
North Country Blue (on the Gallery Stage)
North Country Blue (on the Gallery Stage)
North Country Blue includes some of the best young bluegrass musicians in California – four young women whose ages range from just 12 to 14. All of the girls have been stalwarts in the California Bluegrass Association’s “Kids on Bluegrass” program and Youth Academy, and they have several years of prior band experience among them despite their young age. The band members come from all over Northern California – from Berkeley to the Sierra foothills to the Central Valley – and chose their name after it was dropped in their tip bucket as a suggestion at a street fair.