David Wilcox

David Wilcox

Justin Ferron

Thursday, November 8th

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$22 ADV / $26 DOOR (plus fees)

  • All tickets are subject to an additional $4 per ticket facility fee.

David Wilcox
David Wilcox
Cleveland-born David Wilcox was inspired to play guitar after hearing a fellow college student playing in a stairwell. His lyrical insight is matched by a smooth baritone voice, virtuosic guitar chops, and creative open tunings, giving him a range and tenderness rare in folk music. He released an independent album in 1987, was a winner of the prestigious Kerrville Folk Festival New Folk award in 1988, and by 1989 he had signed with A&M Records. His first release on the label, 'How Did You Find Me Here', sold over 100,000 copies the first year largely by word of mouth. Now, 17 albums into a career marked by personal revelation and wildly loyal fans, David continues to find and deliver joy, inspiration, and invention.

Considered a 'songwriter's songwriter', his songs have been covered by artists such as k.d. lang and many others. In addition to his writing prowess, his skills as a performer and storyteller are unmatched. He holds audiences rapt with nothing more than a single guitar, thoroughly written songs, a fearless ability to mine the depths of human emotions of joy, sorrow and everything in between, and all tempered by a quick and wry wit.

Reflecting on well over 20 years of record-making and touring extensively around the US and world, Wilcox says, "Music still stretches out before me like the head-lights of a car into the night. It's way beyond where I am, but it shows where I'm going. I used to think that my goal was to catch up, but now I'm grateful that the music is always going to be way out in front to inspire me."
Justin Ferron
Justin Ferron
Justin Farren was raised on the outskirts of Sacramento. Riding bikes up dirt hills with his brother and the neighbor kids.
He was always a person of intense focus, I call it his master focus.
The story goes that he learned to read at three, and ride a motorized dirt bike at four. But legends are common in his family,
from grand larcenist to circus perfomer ancestors and a solo pilot grandma.


Justin was the lead shot putter at his school, and had a perfect basketball shot. He loved sports, football, soccer, basketball, and hoped to play professionally one day.
Then, there was a bend in the road when his brother decided they should start a band. Justin got a bass and his brother a guitar. They bought a book of basic chords, and Justin switched lanes. His master focus shifted from sports to songs and, since then, songs have been what mattered most. He learned albums by ear from start to finish, it was the real beginning of 'doing it yourself' for what became a do it yourself man.

At 15, he bought Yellow, the truck of his life. He rebuilt the engine, twice. (The first time it burst into flames.) This is just one example of how he became an independent, stable person well before his peers. In truth, Justin seems to be aging in reverse, younger and younger as the years pass. He is way more likely to toilet paper a house now than he ever was as a kid.

Justin wanted to record albums, so he became a recording engineer. Justin wanted his own house, so he built it from the ground up. Justin wanted to work for himself, so he took his house building knowledge and became a handyman extraordinaire. Really, he's like what many of us may think of our grandparents: Intense, hardworking, autonomous, highly skilled in their pursuits.

Which leads us back to songwriting. I would throw up if I tried to write a Justin Farren song. He looks at a song in such a multidimensional way, but the end result is enchanting, and feels effortless. Justin plays a cheap guitar, But is often asked about its tone. I think the sound they hear is in his playing. I can only barely explain what he's doing, a combination of unboxed fluidity, and muted space when it serves.

Justin lives a humble life in small house in the most working class part of town. Still driving old Yellow, and wearing mostly previously owned clothes. He lives abundantly, he eats real food, and plays music with his favorite people. He would say he's a lucky guy, but I think we are the lucky guys to have him around. Maybe I'm biased, I married him. ~Kerry Farren